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CPRA – California Privacy Rights Acts

The California Privacy Rights Act 2023 (CPRA) is a privacy law that was enacted in California in November 2020, and it went into effect on January 1, 2023. The CPRA builds upon the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), which was enacted in 2018, and extends the privacy rights of California residents.

The CPRA gives Californians the right to know what personal information businesses collect about them, the right to request that businesses delete their personal information, and the right to opt-out of the sale of their personal information. CPRA also requires businesses to provide specific information about their data practices, including the categories of personal information they collect and the purposes for which they use that information.

What is the difference between CCPA & CPRA? 

One key difference between the CPRA and the CCPA is that the CPRA expands the definition of “personal information” to include new categories such as geolocation data, biometric information, and internet or other electronic network activity information, such as browsing history and search history.

The CPRA also creates the California Privacy Protection Agency (CPPA), which will be responsible for enforcing the law and ensuring that businesses are complying with it. The CPPA will have the authority to conduct investigations, impose fines, and bring enforcement actions against businesses that violate the CPRA.

CPRA

Requirements of CPRA

The California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) imposes several requirements on businesses operating in California:

  • Notice and Disclosure Requirements: Businesses must provide clear and conspicuous notice to California residents about their data practices. Including the categories of personal information they collect and the purposes for which they use that information.
  • Right to Know: As a California resident, you have the right to ask a business about the personal information they have collected from you. This includes details like the categories of information gathered, where it came from, and who it was shared with.
  • Right to Request Deletion: California residents have the right to request that a business delete their personal information.
  • Opt-Out of Sale: California residents have the right to opt-out of the sale of their personal information by a business.
  • Limits on Use of Sensitive Personal Information: The CPRA imposes limits on the use of sensitive personal information, such as precise geolocation data, biometric information, and race or ethnicity information.
  • Data Security Requirements: Businesses must implement and maintain reasonable security procedures and practices to protect the personal information they collect.
  • Data Breach Notification Requirements: In the event of a data breach, businesses must provide notice to California residents and, in some cases, to the California attorney general.
  • Responsibility for Service Providers: Businesses are responsible for ensuring that their service providers comply the CPRA’s requirements.
  • Compliance Obligations for Businesses Operating in California: All businesses operating in California must comply with the CPRA’s requirements, regardless of where they are located.

In addition to these requirements, the CPRA creates the California Privacy Protection Agency (CPPA), which will be responsible for enforcing the law and ensuring that businesses are complying with it. The CPPA will have the authority to conduct investigations, impose fines, and bring enforcement actions.

Key provision of CPRA

A key provision of the CPRA is the right to know what personal information companies collect and share about individuals. Companies must now provide consumers with access to specific categories of personal information upon request. In addition, the CPRA requires companies to provide consumers with the right to delete their personal information. And to opt out of the sale of their personal information.

Conclusion 

In conclusion, the California Privacy Rights Act represents a significant step forward in privacy protection for Californians. The law provides individuals with new rights and protections, additionally holds companies accountable for their handling of personal information. By creating the CPPA, the law also provides for stronger enforcement. Therefore, Which will help to ensure that companies comply with the provisions of the law. If you live in California, it is important to understand your privacy rights under the CPRA. In last you need to take steps to protect your personal information.

FAQs

Define CPRA? 

The California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) is a state privacy law in California, USA, enacted in November 2020. It extends and enhances the privacy rights of California residents established under the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA).

What is Opt-Out of Sale?

Opt-Out of Sale: California residents have the right to opt-out of the sale of their personal information by a business.

What is the difference between CPRA & CCPA? 

The CPRA and the CCPA are two different laws, therefore One difference between them is the definition of “personal information”. The CPRA expands the definition to include new categories. These new categories include geolocation data, biometric information, and internet or other electronic network activity information. In last examples of the latter category are browsing history and search history.

What is the scope of CPRA? 

In conclusion, the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) protects the personal information of California residents. Personal information is defined broadly and includes any data that can directly or indirectly identify. A California resident or household, such as names, addresses, email addresses, phone numbers, and more.

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